Basic Science Track

World Sleep 2017 Basic Science Track

Preliminary Scientific Program. All content is subject to change.


Basic Science Symposia
Monday, October 9 – Wednesday, October 11 (listed by day & time)

Monday, October 9
9:00am – 10:30am I Meeting Hall 1B

S07: The role of genetic biomarkers in sleep medicine
This symposium aims to provide the most recent advance regarding the importance of genetic approaches in sleep and sleep medicine.

Chair: S. Tufik, Brazil Speakers: M. Tafti, Switzerland; R. Amaral Jr., Brazil; P. Farias Tempaku, Brazil

Monday, October 9
10:30am – 12:00pm I Meeting Hall 1B

S15: Local sleep and local wake: From basic science to Sleep Arousal Disorders
This translational symposium will give an overview on the state of the art in current local sleep and local wake research, covering its cellular, neurophysiological, clinical, and methodological aspects.

Chair: A. Castelnovo, United States Speakers: V. Vyazovskiy, United Kingdom; L. Nobili, Italy; C. Schenck, United States

Monday, October 9
2:00pm – 3:30pm I Meeting Hall 1B

S22: The waking, sleeping and dreaming brain: New circuits and insights
Understanding the circuit basis by which the brain regulates behavioral state control, including maintenance of wake, non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep and rapid-eye-movement (REM; or paradoxical) sleep, and the transitions between these states has long been a goal of sleep neuroscientists and sleep neurologists. Over the past 5 years, and due in part to the advent of newer genetic-based tools and approaches that have permitted the unprecedented interrogation of discrete circuit elements (transmitters, pathways, cell populations) in behaving animals, we have gleaned new, and often unexpected, insights into this circuitry. In turn new cellular and molecular targets for treating sleep-based disorders have been identified, marking this work in particular as central to the research and clinical mission within the international sleep community.

Chairs: P.M. Fuller, United States; M. Lazarus, Tsukuba, Japan Speakers: L. de Lecea, United States; A. Venner, United States; Y. Oishi, Japan; A. Yamanaka, Japan; A. Adamantidis, Switzerland

Monday, October 9
5:30pm – 7:00pm I Meeting Hall 1B

S30: Behavioral and neurophysiological influences of waking system on sleep
The proposed symposium aims to look into the principles of brain activity during wakefulness and the behavioral and physiological consequences of this state. We will describe the main brain regions responsible for the vigilance state, and discuss the effects of manipulations or dysregulations on these areas. Speakers will address the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological aspects of waking generation and maintenance, highlight specific brain areas and nuclei responsible for the transitions between sleep and wake states, integrating the basic knowledge with the clinical implications of wake-sleep regulation.

Chairs: M.L. Andersen, Brazil; E. Garcia-Rill, United States Speakers: L. Goetz, France; I. Arnulf, Paris, France


Tuesday, October 10, 2017
9:00am – 10:30am I Meeting Hall 1B

S46: New approaches to studies of genetics of sleep and its disorders
Novel concepts and approaches are emerging and they are being employed to determine novel gene variants. These new concepts include: new high-throughput phenotyping strategies; new methods to recruit subjects for genetic research; new mouse resources; new approaches to identifying genes with pleiotrophic effects on multiple phenotypes; new analytical approaches based on machine learning. The goals of this symposium are to present these new approaches and to give up-to-date state-of-the-art presentations.

Chair: A. Pack, United States Speakers: E. Mignot, United States; O. Veatch, United States; P. Cistulli, Australia; D. Mazzotti, United States

Tuesday, October 10, 2017
2:00pm – 3:30pm I Meeting Hall 1B

S62: Sleep slow waves: From cells to consciousness
The objective of the symposium is to highlight how fundamental slow waves are for our brain across various domains. To approach this, findings from cells to system level, from multi-unit activity to consciousness and from healthy to pathological functioning are discussed. VV will start by describing the activity pattern at the cellular level and how these patterns are related to behavior in animals.

Chair: R. Huber, Switzerland Speakers: V. Vyazovskiy, United Kingdom; Y. Nir, Israel; M. Massimini, Italy; R. Benca, United States

Tuesday, October 10, 2017
3:30pm – 5:00pm I Meeting Hall 1B

S62: Sleep slow waves: From cells to consciousness
The symposium will introduce four previously either completely unknown or only rudimentary characterized new players in response to loss of sleep. The contents of the symposium consists of a substantial amount of previously unpublished data, and has been collected from both animal and human studies.

Chair: T. Porkka-Heiskanen, Finland Speakers: M. Bellesi, Italy; H.-K. Wigren, Finland; K. Wright, United States; D. Skene, Switzerland

Tuesday, October 10, 2017
5:30pm – 7:00pm I Meeting Hall 1B

S76: Sleep, slow waves and brain temperature: Insights from hibernators
Research into the relationship between sleep and hypothermic states like hibernation and daily torpor has a long history. All three are characterized by a reversible reduction in metabolic rate that produces a decrease in body temperature. Research investigating the similarities and differences between hibernation/torpor and sleep showed that deep hibernation and daily torpor are probably not similar to sleep as they are followed by a period of deep sleep with increased EEG slow-wave activity, as if the animals were sleep deprived during torpor. In the symposium, in which we managed to bring together the few research groups that are active in this field, we will try to gain insight into this matter by discussing newly obtained data and analysis within this context.

Chair: R. Amici, Italy Speakers: T. de Boer, Leiden, The Netherlands; V. Vyazovskiy, United Kingdom; K. Drew, United States; M. Cerri, Italy


Wednesday, October 11, 2017
9:00am – 10:30am I Meeting Hall V

S79: Cerebral networks during sleep and after sleep deprivation
The aim of this symposium is to discuss new advancements in our understanding of how cerebral networks are modulated by sleep and after sleep loss.

Chairs: J. Carrier, Canada; J.-M. Lina, Canada Speakers: U. Olcese, The Netherlands; G. Piantoni, Utrecht, United States; A. Bagshaw, United Kingdom; G. Vandewalle, Liege, Belgium

Wednesday, October 11, 2017
10:30am – 12:00pm I Meeting Hall V

S84: Cortical nNOS neurons: A nexus between homeostatic sleep drive and EEG slow wave activity?
Together, these presentations will present the latest results on this unusual neuronal population and their potential role as a link to help understand sleep homeostasis and Borbely’s Process S.

Chair: T. Kilduff, United States Speakers: L. Dittrich, Germany; R. Williams, United States; M. Capogna, Denmark

Wednesday, October 11, 2017
2:00pm – 3:30pm I Meeting Hall IV

S88: Novel biomarkers for sleep insufficiency and sleep disorders
Aim: To highlight recent advances and novel approaches for identifying biomarkers of sleep insufficiency. This symposium will provide an overview of recently published and unpublished results from four leading researchers from three continents and covering both laboratory and field studies as well as healthy participants and sleep disorder patients.

Chair: D.-J. Dijk, United Kingdom Speakers: J.J. Gooley, Singapore; T. Porkka-Heiskanen, Finland; L. Kheirandish-Gozal, United States

Wednesday, October 11, 2017
3:30pm – 5:00pm I Meeting Hall IV

S93: Infra-slow (< 0.1 Hz) oscillations: from the cell to the clinic
The aim of the present symposium is to provide a broad overview over recent developments in this field. We will trace the phenomenology of ISOs from cell preparations in vitro to full-band EEG in sleep-disordered patients, including local field potentials and EEG studies in mice and power-band fluctuations in healthy sleepers. The symposium brings together experts from both basic and clinical research to aim for a differentiated introduction to the field that is accessible and relevant to both basic and clinical sleep researchers.

Chair: S. Fulda, Switzerland Speakers: S. Hughes, United Kingdom; A. Lüthi, Switzerland; F. Weber, Germany


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